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Are desktop 3D printers really office friendly?

The answer might surprise you.

We naturally assume that a 3D printer small enough to sit on your desk - and is therefore called a desktop 3D printer - must be suitable for a typical office, healthcare or educational environment. But, is that really the case?

In order for you to use a 3D printer in your office, yes, the 3D printer must be compact enough to sit on your desk, small table or credenza. But there’s more to it than physical size. Think about your office. What would your requirements be to introduce new equipment into a relatively small space where you work 8+ hours per day? Personally, I would want a 3D printer in my office to be quiet, clean and safe to use.

But there’s more. The key words here are to use. The process of 3D printing doesn’t just involve a 3D printer building a part. In addition to preparing your file in software, 3D printers, including desktop 3D printers, require post-processing following 3D printing in order to make the part usable. For example:

  • Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM): the 3D printed part spends around 4-8 hours in a heated, agitated sodium hydroxide bath
  • Stereolithography (SLA): the part is rinsed in alcohol, supports are cut or sanded and the part is light cured
  • Photopolymer Jetting: supports are removed from the part using a water jet system or wax oven
  • Selective Laser Sintering (SLS): the part must be excavated from a bed of powder and then fully de-powdered
  • Digital Light Projection (DLP): the part is rinsed in alcohol, supports are cut or sanded and the part is light cured
  • Powder Bed Binding: the part must be excavated from a bed of powder and then fully de-powdered, sanded (if smoothness is desired) and coated with a substance such as cyanoacrylate (CA).


FDM support removal.

As you might imagine, or know from experience, these processes are time consuming, expensive, messy and, in some cases, toxic. To be sure, none of them are suitable to use inside of your standard office. In fact, many require special venting, storage or disposal.


Support removal using Rize.

Rize provides the only full 3D printing process, desktop or otherwise, that is suitable for a manufacturing engineer's office, healthcare facility or classroom because it eliminates post processing after printing. So, for example, now you can produce end-use and production parts on demand right in your office to keep the assembly line running and go to market faster. Our patented APD (Augmented Polymer Deposition) technology jets Release One ink between the support and the part, enabling you to release the part from its support in just seconds, right in your office with your bare hands. No mess, no chemicals, no special facility or disposal requirements, no filing, sanding or coating. The part is ready to use. Rize offers the only true, end-to-end office-friendly 3D printing solution.