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A new paradigm in manufacturing: The Manufacturing Office

Today’s commercial-grade 3D printers are by and large prototyping and tooling machines that need to exist in additive manufacturing labs due to their size, expense, special facility and equipment requirements and complex pre- and post-processing methods.

McKinsey Global Institute reports* that of the $12 trillion** manufacturing industry, $800 billion per year will be direct manufacturing and tooling by 2025. And, of that, 50% ($230 billion to $550 billion per year) will be 3D printed. Today, only a few systems, Carbon, HP and some metal 3D printers, are capable of addressing the market for low-to mid-volume manufacturing parts and they are, without question, legitimizing 3D printing for manufacturing. But, these machines have significant limitations that restrict the large-scale adoption and applications for direct manufacturing: they are large, expensive, time-consuming and complex systems that must be located in labs.

An Untapped Market

There’s an enormous, unaddressed market for producing customized one-offs and low-volume manufactured parts and tooling on demand, in non-lab locations, including the mechanical engineer’s office to make real functional parts; the manufacturing floor next to the assembly line to make custom tools, jigs and fixtures on the fly; in the factory to make spare part replacements on demand vs. in bulk years earlier and stored; in the dental, medical and audiologist office to produce dental devices, surgical guides and hearing aids tailored to each patient; the mechanic shop to make replacement parts; on ships, in air, on spacecraft and in military field locations for field repairs and more.

The few existing manufacturing-capable 3D printing systems can’t address this market. It’s simply not efficient or practical for them to produce one-offs, given their size, price and complexity and they certainly aren’t systems that can be located in the office or in other remote, non-lab locations due to their materials, processes and post-processing requirements.

Rize APD Enables the Production Facility of the Future

Rize’s Augmented Polymer Deposition (APD) 3D printing technology is the only one addressing this market, creating the production facility of the future: The Manufacturing Office. And in doing so, Rize is expanding commercial 3D printing adoption and applications. Only APD is capable of 3D printing injection molded-quality parts, with the same strength, surface finish, voxel variable material properties, color and more, while offering a completely safe, clean and easy process from file to finished part – without any post-processing, toxic emissions or harmful materials. These factors, combined with its compact size and affordable price, enable Rize to break the chains of the additive manufacturing lab and permit efficient, low-cost production of customized one-off and low-volume tools, spare parts and end-use products on the fly by the people who need them.

Rize APD Complements Lab Manufacturing Systems

All of this makes Rize 3D printers an ideal complement to the few manufacturing-capable machines sitting labs. In fact, over-burdened additive manufacturing lab managers say that, not only are they happy to use Rize 3D printers in their labs, they’d also like to place them in their engineers’ offices to reduce their own workload and, in so doing, put parts directly and immediately into the hands of the people who need them. Many lab managers we’ve spoke to already have initiatives under way to place machines into their engineers’ offices, but they haven’t had a suitable solution. Until now.

Pre-order your Rize One 3D printer by December 15, 2016 and get free consumables for one year!* Email: sales@rize3d.com

To arrange a personal demo in our Massachusetts office, email sales@rize3d.com.

*May 2013 report

**2016 data